Reviews

James Brogden has followed Hekla’s Children with another tale of long-buried horrors unearthed, but the author’s interest in British history and folklore is combined with an ambition and narrative slipperiness that makes this a compelling chiller in its own right. The story begins with a fantastically rendered moment of horror in the form of an
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Tucked away down a side street in Edwardian London is the most wonderful toy shop imaginable. Papa Jack’s Emporium sells patchwork dogs that are as loyal as the real thing, paper trees that really put down roots, and intricately painted toy soldiers who march off to war with one another. But when a real war
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Autonomous arrives bearing the endorsement of William Gibson, Lauren Beukes and Neal Stephenson, and io9 co-founder Annalee Newitz’s debut lives up to the hype. It’s a cyberpunk thriller but the author is much more interested in big questions than big futuristic fight sequences. The story is divided between Jack, a pirate who reverse-engineers patented drugs
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Thursday 1 March Last year it was Storm Doris that frustrated non-Glaswegian genre fans’ attempts to make their annual pilgrimage to the Glasgow FrightFest. This year the Curse continues with the UK-wide (and very much Glasgow-centred) cold snap which has brought rail, road and air transport to a grinding halt, put Glasgow in effective lockdown,
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Black Panther, the eighteenth entry in the Marvel franchise is a powerful, emotionally engaging and action-packed origin story about identity, African diaspora and the distribution of wealth. It’s a landmark moment in cinema, a black superhero finally gets his own film in the MCU and director Ryan Coogler uses his mega budget and writing skills
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Richard K Morgan’s Altered Carbon novels have been on showrunner Laeta Kalogridis’ wishlist for years now and it’s easy to see the appeal: a Blade Runner-esque setting, endless cyberpunk twists, and a pissed-off morally ambiguous hero navigating a world of complex mythology and endless seediness as downloadable consciousnesses have made immortality a reality. All this
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Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó made a bold breakthrough on the arthouse circuit with 2014’s White God, which concerned a mistreated dog leading a canine uprising. With Jupiter’s Moon, he’s back with another high-concept story and back in social allegory mode. A young migrant fleeing his home in Syria, Aryan (Zsombor Jéger) is separated from his
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